Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Making Connection Between Bullying, Health Problems

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Stress News -- ScienceDaily

Making Connection Between Bullying, Health Problems

The subject of bullying has become a topic of academic interest over the past decade, as scientists and social scientists delve into the psychological and physiological effects for both the bullied and the bully. New research into bullying focuses on the relationship between social pain and physical pain. Social pain brought on by rejection and victimization predicts hormonal changes that can lead to health problems, such as high blood pressure, abdominal pain, headaches and joint pain. For example, changes in cortisol, “the stress hormone,” have been linked to being bullied.



Anger Management News -- ScienceDaily

Making Connection Between Bullying, Health Problems

The subject of bullying has become a topic of academic interest over the past decade, as scientists and social scientists delve into the psychological and physiological effects for both the bullied and the bully. New research into bullying focuses on the relationship between social pain and physical pain. Social pain brought on by rejection and victimization predicts hormonal changes that can lead to health problems, such as high blood pressure, abdominal pain, headaches and joint pain. For example, changes in cortisol, “the stress hormone,” have been linked to being bullied.




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Saturday, May 17, 2014

Ties between alcohol, PTSD examined

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Stress News -- ScienceDaily

Ties between alcohol, PTSD examined

Alcohol abuse occurs in 52% of men and 28% of women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Comorbid alcoholism and PTSD leads more frequently to low income, unemployment, and overall social dysfunction than either condition on its own, in part due to the clinical challenges their simultaneous treatment poses. Researchers set out to examine relationships between the factors contributing to these challenges.




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Friday, May 16, 2014

Reduction in volume in hippocampus region of brain seen in psychotic disorders

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Bipolar Disorder News -- ScienceDaily

 photo 3507626_zps9d225859.gifReduction in volume in hippocampus region of brain seen in psychotic disorders

Reduction in brain volume in the hippocampus (a region related to memory) was seen in patients with the psychotic disorders schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and psychotic bipolar disorder. The pathophysiology of psychotic disorders remains unclear, especially schizoaffective disorder. Changes in volume in the hippocampus are a hallmark of schizoaffective disorder. Advances in image processing allow for the precise parceling of specific hippocampal areas.




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War and Peace (of Mind): Mindfulness training for military could help them deal with stress

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Anxiety News -- ScienceDaily

 photo 3507626_zps9d225859.gifWar and Peace (of Mind): Mindfulness training for military could help them deal with stress

Mindfulness training -- a combination of meditation and body awareness exercises -- can help U.S. Marine Corps personnel prepare for and recover from stressful combat situations. The study suggests that incorporating meditative practices into pre-deployment training might be a way to help the U.S. military reduce rising rates of stress-related health conditions, including PTSD, depression and anxiety, within its ranks.




Subliminal Hypnosis Audios: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Victims want to change, not just punish, offenders

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Relationships News -- ScienceDaily

 photo 3507626_zps9d225859.gifVictims want to change, not just punish, offenders

Revenge is a dish best served with a side of change. A series of experiments conducted has found that punishment is only satisfying to victims if the offenders change their attitude as a result of the punishment. The findings offer insights into a wide range of situations -- from casual encounters to the sentencing of a criminal. And the research advances efforts in psychology and philosophy to understand the social motives of punishment and the communicative aspects of punishment.




Subliminal Hypnosis Audios: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books

Monday, May 12, 2014

Intimate partner violence in men who have sex with men is linked to adverse health effects

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Relationships News -- ScienceDaily

Intimate partner violence in men who have sex with men is linked to adverse health effects

Intimate partner violence among men who have sex with men (MSM) is linked to greater risk of mental and physical health symptoms, substance misuse, and sexually transmitted infections, according to a new research article.




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Sunday, May 11, 2014

Listening to bipolar disorder: Smartphone App detects mood swings via voice analysis

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Bipolar Disorder News -- ScienceDaily

Listening to bipolar disorder: Smartphone App detects mood swings via voice analysis

A smartphone app that monitors subtle qualities of a person’s voice during everyday phone conversations shows promise for detecting early signs of mood changes in people with bipolar disorder. While the app still needs much testing before widespread use, early results from a small group of patients show its potential to monitor moods while protecting privacy.


Antipsychotic medication associated with reduced rate of violent crime

People who use antipsychotic medication -- such as clozapine or risperidone -- to treat psychiatric illness are nearly half as likely to commit a violent crime compared to when they are not using such medication, according to new results published in The Lancet. The use of mood stabilizing drugs -- such as lithium or carbamazepine -- is also associated with a reduced rate of violent crime, although the reduction is less pronounced, and only in patients with bipolar disorder.




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Antipsychotic medication associated with reduced rate of violent crime

Books: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books


Anger Management News -- ScienceDaily

 photo 3507626_zps9d225859.gifAntipsychotic medication associated with reduced rate of violent crime

People who use antipsychotic medication -- such as clozapine or risperidone -- to treat psychiatric illness are nearly half as likely to commit a violent crime compared to when they are not using such medication, according to new results published in The Lancet. The use of mood stabilizing drugs -- such as lithium or carbamazepine -- is also associated with a reduced rate of violent crime, although the reduction is less pronounced, and only in patients with bipolar disorder.




Subliminal Hypnosis Audios: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books

Athletes' fear of failure likely to lead to 'choke,' study shows

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Anxiety News -- ScienceDaily

Athletes' fear of failure likely to lead to 'choke,' study shows

Anxiety about a competitive situation makes even the most physically active of us more likely to slip-up -- and backs up 'catastrophe theory,' research shows. "Our research indicates that heightened cognitive anxiety, brought on by the competitive scenario, really does affect performance abilities in physically active people -- and the same is likely to apply even for trained athletes," a researcher said.



Anger Management News -- ScienceDaily

Antipsychotic medication associated with reduced rate of violent crime

People who use antipsychotic medication -- such as clozapine or risperidone -- to treat psychiatric illness are nearly half as likely to commit a violent crime compared to when they are not using such medication, according to new results published in The Lancet. The use of mood stabilizing drugs -- such as lithium or carbamazepine -- is also associated with a reduced rate of violent crime, although the reduction is less pronounced, and only in patients with bipolar disorder.


Today's offenders are tomorrow's victims in gangs

Gang members are twice as likely to become both a victim and an offender of a crime than non-gang members, as single acts of violence often lead to retribution between gangs as a whole, according to a new study. "In other words, gang members are not distinctly offenders or victims; instead, gang membership is a common source of both forms of violence," said the study's lead author.




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Frequent arguments with family, friends linked to doubling in death risk in middle age

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Relationships News -- ScienceDaily

 photo 3507626_zps9d225859.gifFrequent arguments with family, friends linked to doubling in death risk in middle age

Frequent arguments with partners, relatives, or neighbors may boost the risk of death from any cause in middle age, suggests research. Men and those not in work seemed to be the most vulnerable, the findings indicate. Constant arguing seemed to be the most harmful for health. The evidence also suggests that supportive social networks and strong relationships are good for general health and wellbeing.




Subliminal Hypnosis Audios: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books

Friday, May 9, 2014

Tracking the Source of 'Selective Attention' Problems in Brain-Injured Vets

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PTSD News -- ScienceDaily

Tracking the Source of 'Selective Attention' Problems in Brain-Injured Vets

The obvious cognitive symptoms of minor traumatic brain injury can dissipate within a few days, but blast-exposed veterans may continue to have problems focusing attention on one sound source and ignoring others, an ability known as "selective auditory attention.” According to a new study, such apparent "hearing" problems actually may be caused by diffuse injury to the brain's prefrontal lobe.




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Thursday, May 8, 2014

Tackling test anxiety may help prevent more severe problems

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PTSD News -- ScienceDaily

Tackling test anxiety may help prevent more severe problems

Showing students how to cope with test anxiety might also help them to handle their built-up angst and fretfulness about other issues. The results of a new study show that anxiety intervention programs that focus on academic matters fit well into the demands of the school routine, and do not carry the same stigma among youth as general anxiety programs do.




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Bad at recognizing people: Blame your genes

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Relationships News -- ScienceDaily

Bad at recognizing people: Blame your genes

The ability to recognize faces is a distinct human skill, separate from a general ability to recognize objects, and can be inherited. In other words, people who are good at recognizing cars are not necessarily good at recognizing faces.


Masculinity still viewed as tied to sexuality

We are still inclined to regard heterosexual men as more masculine than homosexual men and single men as more competent than married men. Researchers asked 158 participants to evaluate a fictional man. His description was varied so that he was sometimes heterosexual and sometimes homosexual, and sometimes single and sometimes married; other facts about him stayed the same. The researchers found that the man was evaluated as most manly when he was both heterosexual and married.




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Just keep your promises: Going above and beyond does not pay off

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Relationships News -- ScienceDaily

Just keep your promises: Going above and beyond does not pay off

If you are sending Mother's Day flowers to your mom this weekend, chances are you opted for guaranteed delivery: the promise that they will arrive by a certain time. Should the flowers not arrive in time, you will likely feel betrayed by the sender for breaking their promise. But if they arrive earlier, you likely will be no happier than if they arrive on time, according to new research.


Does Facebook affect our self-esteem, sense of belonging?

With 1.11 billion users per month on average, Facebook has become a global phenomenon offering continual and direct communication with friends and family. Research into how social media websites define us socially, and the influence that social media has on our personal welfare, suggests that a lack of social participation on Facebook leads to people feeling less meaningful.



Anxiety News -- ScienceDaily

Tackling test anxiety may help prevent more severe problems

Showing students how to cope with test anxiety might also help them to handle their built-up angst and fretfulness about other issues. The results of a new study show that anxiety intervention programs that focus on academic matters fit well into the demands of the school routine, and do not carry the same stigma among youth as general anxiety programs do.




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Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Early depression, anger may taint love life even 20 years later, study shows

Books: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books


Anger Management News -- ScienceDaily

 photo 3507626_zps9d225859.gifEarly depression, anger may taint love life even 20 years later, study shows

Negative emotions people may have suffered as young adults can have a lasting grip on their couple relationships, well into middle age, research demonstrates. The study followed 341 people for 25 years, and found that negative emotions they may have suffered as young adults can have a lasting grip on their couple relationships, well into middle age. The fact that depression and anger experienced during the teen years clung to people, even through major life events such as child-rearing, marriages and careers was surprising, researchers note.




Subliminal Hypnosis Audios: Healthy Minds at Amazon.com:  Books